2020 Northern Lights Calendar – July Photo

July photo in the calendar.

The July image was photographed this year on August 31, 2019 at 10:28PM over Lake Michigamme. Same family trip as the May image, just the next night and a more active, better aurora display! And this time instead of just watching with me, my daughter photographed the aurora as well. It was our last night of the camping trip so always nice to finish up with an Aurora display.

This image was shot from the boat launch at Van Riper State Park again same as the January photo. Being Labor Day weekend the park campgrounds were jam packed! Not ideal, but we only needed a place to stay for the night so it was fine. When it got dark enough to see the lights my daughter and I was already heading to the spot. As it was so crowded there were several people at the boat launch this time all waning to see the aurora. We were still able to find a nice spot on the water’s edge with no one in the shot.

My daughter didn’t have her tripod so I let her use mine. A tripod is a must when photographing the aurora because of the slow/long shutter speeds used . Worked out well though. I made a small platform with rocks just on the edge of the water for my camera to sit on. This gave me a very low angle of the lake which I liked with the water and other rocks in the foreground, again, layering the photo. The camera was almost in the water, but didn’t get wet thankfully.

This is one of my daughters photos.

Traffic was still driving along highway 41 across the lake fairly regularly so we had to work to time our shots when no traffic was going by. Although it was kind of a cool lighting effect as you can see in the photo below.

I was quite pleased with the image I made. I think my daughter enjoyed hers as well. We didn’t stay out too long but I did go back for more photos early the next morning. Read about that in the next post.

Exposure data: ISO 3200, 15 seconds at f/2.8, Nikon D750, Nikon 17-35mm lens at 17mm. My focus point on this lens is over the right side of the infinity symbol ∞ < on the lens at 17mm. Its closer to the center of the symbol if I shoot at 35mm.

If you want to see the scientific data on that day go to this link – HERE

Kp number was about 4 when this image was shot..

The Kp Index numbers are not the only info to look at on aurora forecast, however it’s a good place to start. You can find more info on Kp numbers here. KP Info Here.

Here is a link to the Space Weather Prediction Center at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

What are the northern lights?

People ask is this what lights look like with the naked eye? The short answer is no. It has to do with how human eyes see at night, basically in black and white and not very well. More info here.

Have you seen the northern lights?

Thanks for stopping by. Thanks for sharing!

Bryan

2020 Northern Lights Calendar – June Photo

This is the June photograph in my 2020 calendar.

The June image was photographed on September 2, 2016 at 12:20 AM looking through the trees over Lake Superior at Twelve Mile Beach Campground in Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore. This image was shot on the same family trip in the UP as the April photo, just the night/morning before. And my family watched the aurora with me in the early part of the night this time!

We had left Marquette earlier in the day to start the drive toward Pictured Rocks. Until this year all drive up campsites in Pictured Rocks were first come, first serve, so we were not sure where we would be staying. We arrived at the Hurricane River Campground to find it full, its small so I wasn’t surprised as it was late in the day. So we hurried back to Twelve Mile Beach Campground and were lucky to grab one of the last two sites available for the night. It worked out well as I had never photographed the aurora from this location.

Lake Superior seen from the sandy bluff at Twelve Mile Beach Campground.
My daughter wading in Lake Superior.
Sunset through the trees at Twelve Mile Beach Campground.

After setting up camp we drove back down to the Hurricane River to hang out for a bit, the kids ended up in the chilly water of course. Then back to camp to make dinner, a campfire and wait for it to be dark enough to see and photograph the aurora. About an hour after sunset we wandered down to the sandy bluff and beach. And yes the aurora was glowing bright. However I think my wife wanted to see more colors with her eyes the way the camera can pick them up. And I must admit it can be a bit disappointing to some and not as spectacular in person.

I made a cool photo of her standing on the bluff watching the aurora over Lake Superior. Then while shooting through the trees I noticed some aurora rays higher in the sky. These were different then I had seen before. Not like the light pillars that shoot up from the aurora arc and these rays were much higher in the sky. They didn’t last long and although I did make a few images I wish I would have been ready and made a better image of them.

My wife looking out over Lake Superior and the Northern Lights.
Aurora rays higher in the sky.
My wife and daughter watching the Northern Lights.

My son wasn’t as into watching the lights much and I think if I remember correctly my wife was getting a bit cold. So they headed back to camp and the warm fire while my daughter and I went down to the beach to sit, watch and make some more photos. Sitting with her watching the sky and listening to the waves hit the shore was awesome. Having the opportunity to experience this together was special to me as I’m usually alone. One of the most relaxing and peaceful moments I’ve had in my life, I didn’t want it to end. Yet it was late, around 11:30PM, and she was worn out. So I walked her to camp before heading back to the bluff for some more photography.

My daughter relaxes on the beach watching the Northern Lights.
My daughter and I standing on the beach.

I reached the stairway that works its way from the bluff down to the beach and the aurora activity seemed to be increasing. It was around midnight now. I made a few images and while the aurora was quite active I wasn’t sure I liked the composition. Looking back at the image now I do like it more, but still not sure. I then walked along the bluff and noticed the light shinning through the trees more brightly than earlier in the night. That’s when I made the image that is the June photo in the calendar. I mentioned in another post, I try and include other things in the compositions, especially in the foreground, to give a feeling of depth and more dimension to the photograph. Not just shooting the sky even though it’s quite spectacular on its own.

I was approaching 1:00 AM and I needed to wake up early to try and get a campsite at Hurricane River (which I did) I decided crawl into the tent for some sleep happy with what I captured.

Looking out over Lake Superior from the stairway leading to the beach,

If you want to see the scientific data on that day go to this link – HERE

Kp numbers were between 5-6 for part of this night.

The Kp Index numbers are not the only info to look at on aurora forecast, however it’s a good place to start. You can find more info on Kp numbers here. KP Info Here.

Here is a link to the Space Weather Prediction Center at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

What are the northern lights?

People ask is this what lights look like with the naked eye? The short answer is no. It has to do with how human eyes see at night, basically in black and white and not very well. More info here.

You can order a calendar HERE

Have you seen the northern lights?

Thanks for stopping by. Thanks for sharing!

Bryan

2020 Northern Lights Calendar – May Photo

The May image was photographed this year on August 30, 11:58 PM looking at Little Presque Isle and Lake Superior north or Marquette.

I was on another family trip in the UP this year, so again photography was not my main focus. There was a decent aurora predicted this night so I figured after dark and the others went to bed I would head out. We were staying at one of the Little Presque Isle Recreation Area DNR cabins for a night so I figured I try a location nearby called “Top of the World” by locals and use Little Presque Isle as a backup, second location. Everyone else went to bed about 10:00 and that’s when I took off for a couple hours.

When I arrived at the small parking area, it was crowded with cars, some parked along the road. A car passed me asking, “is there a party here?” which I had no idea. College kids from Northern Michigan University like to camp and party up there so I figure that was why all the cars. I parked along the road and hiked up and was right, a bunch of college kids. Not too crazy though. So I walked past saying, “Don’t mind me, just doing some photography.” LOL! They did ask why and were intrigued, so I showed them the photos on the camera LCD screen and they seemed happy.

One for the images from “top of the world” Cool clouds, shooting start in top right corner.

I hung out for a bit, but didn’t like the location or composition I was making plus the noise and lights from the parties wasn’t the best. I decided to hike back to the car and head to the other spot. Oh yeah, I had never been up there in the dark and almost got lost. To be honest without one of the groups bonfires to guide me back, I might have wondered for a while. I have no idea how I got off the trail.

I arrived at Little Presque Isle about 11:15 PM or so finding a few cars in the parking lot but nothing crazy. I walked through the pines to the beach to see if I wanted to shoot there at all. I didn’t like the composition so I walked back to the trail and went out to the point.

First test shot at Little Presque Isle park. More clouds.

Once there I actually had a difficult time figuring out a composition I liked to include the island, the aurora and the stars. There is not much room on the sandy/rocky beach and I didn’t want to get wet. From there the island is more to the northeast and the lights were more in the northwest. There were several rocks and logs near me that I could use in the foreground. And as you can see the clouds were rolling in. Still not sure I like the composition, but I wanted to have another location I had not shot before. I will say to the west the clouds had a great texture to them. I’ll write more about that in the November photo blog post coming soon.

I shot some vertical compositions as well to include the milky way and also shot through the pine trees to include the forest. It wasn’t a spectacular display or the best composition, but its still watching the northern lights over Lake Superior in the UP! Not really a better way to spend the evening.

Milky Way over Little Presque Isle
A different shot with a few faint rays shooting up.
The area in the the daylight.

Exposure data: ISO 3200, 20 seconds at f/2.8, Nikon D750, Nikon 17-35mm lens at 17mm. My focus point on this lens is over the right side of the infinity symbol ∞ < on the lens at 17mm. Its closer to the center of the symbol if I shoot at 35mm.

If you want to see the scientific data on that day go to this link – HERE

Kp numbers were around 3 on this night.

The Kp Index numbers are not the only info to look at on aurora forecast, however it’s a good place to start. You can find more info on Kp numbers here. KP Info Here.

Here is a link to the Space Weather Prediction Center at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

What are the northern lights?

People ask is this what lights look like with the naked eye? The short answer is no. It has to do with how human eyes see at night, basically in black and white and not very well. More info here.

You can order a calendar HERE

Have you seen the northern lights?

Thanks for stopping by. Thanks for sharing!

Bryan

2020 Northern Lights Calendar – April Photo

The April image was photographed over Lake Superior at the mouth of the Hurricane River on the night/morning of September 3, 2016 at 12:39 AM. On this trip I was with my family and the Aurora was active 3 nights in a row, so they were able to witness the magic of the northern lights! More on that with the June photo. This image was shot the second night/early morning while everyone else was sleeping after a long day of hiking and sunset Pictured Rocks cruise on Lake Superior. I tried to get my daughter up but wasn’t going to happen this time. 🙂

Sun behind Grand Portal Point on the sunset cruise.
Another tour boat is dwarfed by Indian Head.
Sun shining through open section of Grand Portal Point.

As I’ve mentioned the Hurricane River Campground in Pictured Rocks is one of my favorite campgrounds in the state so when in the UP I and we often end up there. Always when visiting Pictured Rocks or towards the end of a trip working my way home. So I have quite a few aurora images from this location.

Our camp at mealtime.

I started photographing the aurora around 10:00 PM and continued for the next four hours moving to different locations along the beach and shoreline. The display was bright and pulsating with light pillars shooting into the sky off and on. As you can see in the calendar image and some of the others posted here I prefer to use the shore ling and/or some type of layering or framing instead of just shots of the sky. This gives the image for interest and a sense of place.

First image shot around 10:00PM
Self portrait shot along the shore a quarter mile or so from the river around 11:30 PM

There were a few other people on the beach and at first it was a challenge keeping them out of the photos especially when they would turn their headlamps on. Of course it was very dark and I was tucked up under a tree by the mouth of the river so I’m sure they had no idea I was even out there. I debated about including them in some photos, however ultimately the photojournalist in me took over and I decided to include that human element in the images to help tell a story. I think photos should tell a story, not just be pretty pictures, even though I don’t always succeed at that.

Another shot with the group of people watching the show.

I will say looking back on the images I wish I would have stayed in one place and really focused on the changing lights, and it would have been great to shoot a time lapse. I will say I often second guess myself on choosing where to shoot and what to shoot. Was it the best spot? Did I miss something? Would this have been better? Yet I’ve also learned I really need to choose and stick with it. Yes I might miss some shots. But if I keep changing while shooting I’ll miss all the shots. It also seems looking back at the images the activity was still going when I called it a night. Not really sure why I stopped shooting other than fatigue. I should have just sat in the sand and fell asleep.

Although I will say when shooting at night next to the lake or rivers/waterfalls at night I do think about bears from time to time. I have never seen a bear in Pictured Rocks, tracks on the beach yes, however I would never hear one walk up on me in the dark with the sound of the waves and water in my ears. I have to admit it would be cool though.

This is a favorite image of mine! (I wanted the shot with the people in the calendar)
One of the last shots I took on this outing around 1:00 AM.

Exposure data: ISO 3200, 20 seconds at f/4.5, Nikon D750, Nikon 17-35mm lens at 17mm. My focus point on this lens is over the right side of the infinity symbol ∞ < on the lens at 17mm. Its closer to the center of the symbol if I shoot at 35mm. I want to mention you will notice many of my images are in the 20 second range. Looking back on the nights the aurora was very active I wish I would have shot more in the 5 second range to get a put more texture or detail in the lights. So I guess I need to keep hunting!

If you want to see the scientific data on that day go to this link – HERE

There was a G2 geomagnetic storm starting to hit earth with Kp numbers hitting between 4 and 6 through the night.

The Kp Index numbers are not the only info to look at on aurora forecast, however it’s a good place to start. You can find more info on Kp numbers here. KP Info Here.

Here is a link to the Space Weather Prediction Center at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

What are the northern lights?

People ask is this what lights look like with the naked eye? The short answer is no. It has to do with how human eyes see at night, basically in black and white and not very well. More info here.

You can order a calendar HERE

Have you seen the northern lights?

One more thing. I know I’m not good at writing. I plan to keep at it though even past writing about the calendar. Maybe you will find something interesting, useful or even learn something.

Thanks for stopping by. Thanks for sharing!

Bryan

2020 Northern Lights Calendar – March Photo

March image in my 2020 calendar shot over Brevort Lake.

The March image was photographed over Brevort Lake on the night of October 7, 2015 at 10:13 PM over Brevort Lake in the southeast section of the UP. Like I mentioned in the last post there was a G3 geomagnetic storm starting when I photographed the February image early that morning and it continued getting stronger as the day went on – and I almost missed it!

After photographing the aurora at dawn on the 7th at the Hurricane River (see last post) I crawled back in the tent trying for a bit more sleep. I was only dosing on and off for an hour or so I decided to get up and start the day. I made the image below not that the sun was up before starting my drive east. My UP trip for this year was over and I needed to start working my way home. I wasn’t sure where I was camping that night, but was in no hurry as I didn’t need to cross the Mackinaw Bridge for the lower peninsula until the next day. I would just work my way toward the bridge and go where the light and fall colors took me. It was still a bit early for fall color which wasn’t quite peak yet.

Mouth of the Hurricane River after the sun was up.

I stopped at Grand Sable Dunes, a few spots along the highway, Tahquamenon Falls, and the scenic Lake Superior Shoreline Road. Then turned back and hit some back roads west and south of the town Trout Lake ending up on highway US2 around Brevort.

An old cabin along highway M-28.
Driving along Lake Superior Shoreline Road.
Tahquamenon Falls

It was getting later in the day and I was tired so I needed to find a place to camp. No, like I said in the last post I don’t remember if I had checked the Aurora forecast or not. Maybe I did, but also knew the weather predicted cloudy skies. Either way I wasn’t thinking about the geomagnetic storm from the sun that was hitting the earth as I drove, I was just tired. So I continued driving east until Straits State Park Campground where I would call it a day, camp and cross the bridge in the morning. But, campground closed, rats!!! So now what? I decided to drive back west to Brevort Lake where I knew there was a National Forest Campground. My best decision of the trip! In about 20 minutes I arrived and even though I think the campground was closed for the season the gate was still open. It was deserted, I had my pick of all the campsites so of course I chose the best one out on a point with a small view of the lake.

Sunset near my campsite on Lake Brevort.
Backing up photos at camp before photographing the aurora.

I set up camp, made dinner and grabbed a shower, figuring since the lights were active in the morning I would try for photos once again as soon as it was dark enough hoping the clouds would stay away. What I treat I was in for. Even though the skies were not all clear it wasn’t completely socked in with clouds either. And as soon as it was dark enough I thought I saw a glow so I made a test shot and sure enough, although not strong, the lights were active! Now, this must have been a lull in the activity because as the night went on things became stronger and more active. The G3 storm was strong and it turns out the KP numbers were 7/7.5! The strongest aurora display I had ever seen!

Test shot. You can see the milky way, cabin lights across the lake and a plane went by.
Another photo early on. A planet, shooting star. Plane contrails, I think??? Milky way, some light pillars starting.

So I set my camp chair on the water’s edge, my feet almost in the water, tripod legs in the water and watched the magic of the Aurora Borealis for over two hours. Would have been longer, however more clouds did move in. No matter. It was amazing. I could see some green and even a bit of magenta with the naked eye. And when the light pillars started shooting into the sky, it gave me chills and goosebumps. I might have even had tears in my eyes. Its really tough to explain the emotion I felt watching this. While I love camping and exploring in the UP alone, which is how I always do it, I wished my family was there to witness this with me. Yet all alone in this campground I couldn’t help but feel like I was the only one on earth witnessing this spectacular sight. It was an awe moment for sure. Research has shown we need more awe moments as they are good for our mental health. Read Here.

More clouds moving in before midnight. You can see part of the big dipper. I decided to get into my tent for some much needed sleep after this.

I am so glad that the Straits Park campground was closed. Luck is always a park of seeing the northern lights and nature photography in general. Yes preparation and planning help a lot, but this time luck far outweighed any of that.

I got back out about 3:00 AM to check conditions. Clouds were thicker on the horizon so I crawled back into the tent. You can see the big dipper in this frame. I’m not sure what the orange glow reflecting on the cloud is. My guess would be light pollution from Sault Ste Marie, except its 40 miles away? You can see it in the calendar image as well.

Exposure data: ISO 3200, 25 seconds at F2.8, Nikon D600, Nikon 17-35mm lens at 17mm. My focus point on this lens is over the right side of the infinity symbol ∞ < on the lens at 17mm. Its closer to the center of the symbol if I shoot at 35mm.

If you want to see the scientific data on that day go to this link – HERE

There was a G3 geomagnetic storm starting to hit earth with Kp numbers hitting 7+ through the night, damn clouds. 🙁

The Kp Index numbers are not the only info to look at on aurora forecast, however it’s a good place to start. You can find more info on Kp numbers here. KP Info Here.

Here is a link to the Space Weather Prediction Center at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

What are the northern lights?

People ask is this what lights look like with the naked eye? The short answer is no. It has to do with how human eyes see at night, basically in black and white and not very well. More info here.

You can order a calendar HERE

Have you seen the northern lights?

Thanks for stopping by. Thanks for sharing!

Bryan

2020 Northern Lights Calendar – February Photo

February Calendar Photo

The February image was photographed over Lake Superior on October 7, 2015 at 6:33 AM from the mouth of the Hurricane River while I was camping at the Hurricane River Campground in Picture Rocks National Lakeshore.

I spent a couple days at Pictured Rocks that year and this is one of my favorite paid, drive up campgrounds in the state. Maybe my favorite. I even joke with my kids that site #10 in the lower campground is “my” campsite. 🙂 Although I do like to camp for free on National Forest and State Forest land and sometimes hike in more often than not.

The day before I hiked the Chapel Loop in Pictured Rocks. I think it’s one of the top three hikes in Michigan and you should check it out if you have not hiked it yourself. The trail runs along the tallest sandstone cliffs in the park during the lakeshore section of the hike. Its about 10 miles long and people who have never been to the Lakeshore can’t seem to believe it’s in Michigan. Check out this PHOTO of Grand Portal Point along the hike.

Info hereMap here

I think I need to write about this hike and photography along the way some day..

So needless to say I was quite tired, but I was camping on lake superior and that always means a possibility of being up late into the night and early morning photographing the northern lights.

I’d like to say I was prepared, knowing about the predicted favorable aurora forecast, but I don’t remember doing so. I was still new to the whole night sky photography thing and I more or less just checked every cloud free night to see if the aurora was visible.

My camp was already set up from the day before, so I returned from my hike, made some dinner, photographed the sunset and then relaxed a bit until it was dark enough to see the lights and photograph them. Looking back through the photos the first shot I took was about 9:00 PM. Turns out the Aurora would be active all night long.

Hurricane River Sunset
First image around 9:00 PM. You can see the start of the aurora activity, the milky way and some airglow.

The image I chose for February was at shot at dawn. The sun would rise a little more than an hour after the photo was taken. So you see the warm orange glow of dawn on the bottom right of the photo. Clouds came and went through the night and I was glad to have some in the early morning as I love the texture they create with the aurora back lighting them. Also the moon was still out and setting so you can see a bit of moonlight hitting the sand in the bottom right of the photo as well.

It turns out the aurora activity would only grow stronger as the day went on with a G3 geomagnetic storm was hitting earth. But more on this when I post about the March photograph, stay tuned! 🙂

Aurora behind the clouds.

Exposure data: ISO 2000, 20 seconds at F/2.8. Using a Nikon D600, Nikon 17-35mm lens at 17mm. My focus point on this lens is over the right side of the infinity symbol ∞ < on the lens at 17mm. Its closer to the center of the symbol if I shoot at 35mm.

If memory serves me, I didn’t take notes, I used 20 seconds to have a bit of “wispy” movement in the clouds. At the same time being careful not to have too long of a shutter speed otherwise you would start to see “star trails” and not points of light. You can read a more detailed description of this here “How to Avoid Star Trails by Following the 500 Rule”

Self portrait with my red headlamp watching the aurora grow.

If you want to see the scientific data on that day go to this link – October 7, 2015 aurora.

There was a G3 geomagnetic storm starting to hit earth with Kp numbers climbing as the night went on, into the early morning and the next day.

The Kp Index numbers are not the only info to look at on aurora forecast, however it’s a good place to start. You can find more info on Kp numbers here. KP Info Here.

Here is a link to the Space Weather Prediction Center at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

What are the northern lights?

People ask is this what lights look like with the naked eye? The short answer is no. It has to do with how human eyes see at night, basically in black and white and not very well. More info here.

You can order a calendar HERE

Have you seen the northern lights?

Thanks for stopping by.

Bryan

2020 Northern Lights Calendar – January Photo.

The January photo was photographed over Lake Michigamme on August 31, 2017 about 5:30AM. More specifically the boat launch at Van Riper State Park, so not the most glamorous location. Michigamme and the park are located in the central Upper Peninsula of Michigan, about 40 minutes west of Marquette.

Photo for January in 2020 calendar.

I was on a UP mountain bike trip with my son, 13 at the time, and we were camping at the state park in the rustic campground. So this was not a photography trip yet I always try to make some images if I hear the Aurora forecast is promising and the skies are clear. I don’t remember exactly, but I believe it was cloudy earlier in the night so I didn’t even look to see if anything was visible.

Our campsite at Van Riper State Park

We crawled into the tent on a very chilly night thinking maybe later the skies would clear. I forgot to set my alarm so good thing I woke up at about 4:30 in the morning. I knew my son wouldn’t want to get up to go check the skies to see if the aurora was visible, not his thing. So I quietly got up, grabbed the camera and tripod and walked down to the boat launch, which is only a few hundred years from our campsite. The plan wasn’t to stay out all night anyway as I didn’t want to leave him alone for a long time.

Test photo over the trees from outside the tent.

The skies cleared and I could see the distinctive glow to the north, northwest. I had scouted the boat launch area the evening before while still light out and I had a good idea where I wanted to shoot from to keep the dock out of the image and include some of the shoreline. I liked that some lights from a cabin or house where on off in the distance. Just across the lake is highway 41 but at this time of the morning there was very little traffic if any so I didn’t have to deal with car lights in the trees.

Test photo at the boat launch.

I only stayed out for an hour or so as light pillars were coming and going and I hoped they would get real strong before dawn after which the lights would be too hard to see. So I was quite happy with the images I made, I wasn’t out all night and was able to get some sleep for mountain bike riding the next day.

BTW, exposure data: ISO 3200, 8 seconds at F/2.8. Using a Nikon D600, Nikon 17-35mm lens at 17mm. My focus point on this lens is over the right side of the infinity symbol ∞ < on the lens at 17mm. Its closer to the center of the symbol if I shoot at 35mm.

If you want to see the scientific data on that day go to this link – Space Weather Live

There was a G1 geomagnetic storm with Kp numbers at 5+ but that mostly happened after dawn and sunrise so I would not have seen it. So my guess is this image was during the start of a good Aurora and maybe Kp 4.

The Kp Index numbers are not the only info to look at on aurora forecast, however its a good place to start. You can find more info on Kp numbers here – Kp Numbers Info

Here is a link to the Space Weather Prediction Center at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

What are the northern lights?

People ask is this what lights look like with the naked eye? The short answer is no. It has to do with how human eyes see at night, basically in black and white and not very well

Here is a good write up about why this is – What our eyes see VS what camera sees

More (not exactly) what I see with my eyes.

Some say they can see the colors and maybe so, but in my experience its a milky, white color. Although I have seen a faint glow of green with my eyes. And even though mostly white I have definitely seen light pillars shot up into the sky. But, just because the human eyes are bad a night vision doesn’t mean the color isn’t there. I would also love to be in Greenland or Norway close or above the arctic circle some day as I understand that far north you can see more colors, especially with strong geomagnetic activity.

Have you seen the northern lights?

Thanks for stopping by. – Bryan

Order your calendar HERE!

Mountain bike riding with my son